IF YOU SUSPECT YOU MAY HAVE THE CORONAVIRUS DISEASE (COVID-19), PLEASE CALL THE DEDICATED HOTLINE ON 1800 675 398.

 

 
IT IS MANDATORY TO RING THE CLINIC BEFORE SEEING A GP SO THAT THE CLINIC CAN BE PREPARED. PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR INFORMATION ON COVID19 TELEPHONE CONSULTATION WITH OUR DOCTOR.

In accordance with current Australian Public Health advice, Revita Medical Clinic requests that any individuals who start experiencing respiratory symptoms (fever, cough, difficulty breathing) and have recently travelled ANYWHERE INTERNATIONALLY or had contact with someone diagnosed with the novel coronavirus within the last 14 days call the medical centre or hospital before arrival so that the appropriate infection control measures can be put in place and people can be directed to the best place for testing and treatment.

 

WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?

the Australian Government Department of Health coronavirus

Public information site regarding COVID-19

Call the Victorian Public Health Information Line on 1300 651 160

Summer Is Here-Make Sure You Protect Your Skin

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The most prevalent form of cancer in Australia is skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, basal cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 80% of all diagnosed skin cancers, squamous cell carcinoma makes up around 20%, and melanoma accounts for less than 1%.

It’s critical to protect your skin from the sun’s damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is the primary cause of this disease. With this in mind, here are seven important pointers to keep you safe from skin cancer during the summer and beyond. If you need some checkups, our skin cancer checks  can help you.

Apply Sunscreen

While applying sunscreen before and during outdoor activities and beach visits is critical, it is also crucial to use sunscreen every day on your exposed skin. The sun can harm skin merely by sitting beside a window at home, in a building, or in a car.

On top of that, even on overcast days, apply sunscreen since clouds do not absorb UV radiation. Every two hours, reapply sunscreen to your exposed skin.

Wear a Hat and Sunglasses

Protecting your eyes with suitable, protective sunglasses helps to avoid cataracts and other eye damage, as well as wearing a hat with a brim around that shades your face, ears, and back of your neck for maximum protection is ideal. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, is best to protect your skin against UV radiation.


Avoid Tanning Beds

Indoor tanning, however, is not any safer than UV radiation. This may be more hazardous than the sun since it provides continuous and high exposure to UV rays. It is preferable to use tanning sprays or lotions, which do not harm the skin.


Wear Protective Clothing

Wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants, as well as skirts and dresses, helps minimize UV damage. Try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up if this apparel isn’t feasible. The highest level of UV protection comes from tightly woven fabric. A wet T-shirt provides less UV insulation than a dry one, and darker colors offer more protection than lighter ones. Certain clothing is recognized as providing UV protection by international standards.


Stay in the Shade

Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s intensity is at its greatest, avoid exposure to the sun since this is when the sun’s rays are most intense. If you must go outside, seek out areas with plenty of shade to preserve your skin from damage.


Be Cautious of Medications

Many medications make the skin more sensitive to the sun. Anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medicines, antibiotics, antifungals, and acne therapies are a few examples. If you’re using or receiving one of these medications, limit your sun exposure to avoid skin cancer.


Carefully Examine Skin and Conduct Regular Screenings

Check your skin for any new marks or moles on a regular basis, as well as any changes. Keep an eye out for blemishes that don’t heal and any strange skin conditions. A skin cancer check might assist you in preventing skin cancer’s early stages.

 

Skin Cancer Prevention 

If you have skin problems, see a doctor at the skin cancer clinic. Our nurse practitioners, trained and experienced in offering high-quality personalized healthcare for the whole family, will help you.

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